Traceability is becoming the new benchmark for measuring a brand’s ethical sourcing performance

Traceability is becoming the new benchmark for measuring a brand’s ethical sourcing performance

Unknown reputational risks lurking in the complex layers of global supply chains are prompting brands to look for ways to establish a traceability programme for each product they sell.

A traceability tag enables the company and its customers to trace the product back through all the stages of production including where each of the raw materials came from and where the product was manufactured. The tag will also disclose what social and environmental criteria were used by the brand at each of these points in the supply chain. This will allow customers to understand the social and environmental impact of the product they are buying.

Some of the early initiatives that created awareness about traceability include the Forest Stewardship Council, which certifies sustainable wood; the Marine Stewardship Council, which certifies sustainable fisheries; and various organic and fair trade certifications.

More recently, a series of scandals ranging from health scares for food products to human rights violations in the supply chain have made traceability a hot corporate responsibility issue. Sean Ansett, managing partner at Madrid-based consultancy At Stake Advisors, believes that issues such as carbon miles tracking, water scarcity, community impacts...

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supply chain  sustainable supply chain  traceability 

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