Employees want to volunteer in their communities and companies can help make their efforts worthwhile

Employees want to volunteer in their communities and companies can help make their efforts worthwhile

Volunteering in the community used to be characterised by employees getting involved in hands-on projects – from painting schools to planting trees – often for teambuilding purposes. Now employees are increasingly encouraged to volunteer in ways that make the best use of their core skills.

This is a different model of volunteering. The emphasis is on using the skills employees hone through their everyday work rather than seeing volunteering as an opportunity to do something outside their core competencies.

Convincing employees that their everyday skills are the most useful to the charitable sector can be a challenge. Vodafone UK Foundation head Sarah Shillito says: “We’re trying to encourage our employees to understand that going out and teaching someone how to create an Excel spreadsheet is incredibly useful. It often doesn’t occur to them that this is an asset that they have to offer.”

Many of the companies surveyed for this report go to some pains to ensure employees’ skills are used where they are most valuable. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, a small team of specialised Microsoft employees worked on developing a website that consolidated...

This content is premium content, and only accessible to subscribers. Please log in to view the content - or subscribe here.

Subscribe to read: The changing face of community investment: Volunteering – Returns on human capital

Login

Subscribe

Already a subscriber? Login using the fields below.

To get access to this content, become an Ethical Corporation subscriber today.

Subscribe and join the likes of:

Subscribe here
Close popup
Investment  SRI 

comments powered by Disqus